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Malaria

Malaria is a deadly disease carried by Anopheles mosquitoes. 
 
Every year, it kills around 660,000 people and infects more than 200 million. Ninety percent of these deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa. 
 
Despite malaria mortality rates falling by 25 percent since 2000, a child in Africa still dies every two minutes from malaria. 
 
Malaria is most common in poor, deprived areas. In many cases, malaria itself is the cause of such poverty: malaria patients are often bedridden and incapable of carrying out normal daily tasks, resulting in burdens on households and health services, and loss of income.  
 
This suffering and loss of life are tragically unnecessary because malaria is largely preventable, detectable and treatable. 
 
While ninety percent of malaria deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa, the disease is present in nearly every tropical area where MSF carries out field programmes: from Ethiopia, Sierra Leone, to Cambodia and Myanmar. 
 
In 2017, MSF treated 2,520,600 cases of malaria.  

 

04/05/2021

Burkina Faso: providing healthcare in a region ravaged by violence

Burkina Faso’s North region hosts more than 100,000 internally displaced people who fled recurring violence in this part of the country. Since January 2021, MSF’s mobile teams have been offering healthcare support to people in the villages of Sirfou, Todiame, Rounga and Ouindigui, where thousands of these displaced persons have settled, but where access to healthcare and other basic services is severely limited.

20/04/2021

Pumps, bicycles and satellites: how MSF is fighting malaria in Burundi

Teams from Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) have carried out a number of large-scale malaria prevention campaigns in eastern Burundi in recent years, most recently in the hills of Kinyinya. Their objective: to attack the disease at its source by reducing the number of mosquitoes.

MSF team set-up a mobile clinic in Riang, Jonglei state.
19/01/2021

MSF emergency team responds to worrying health needs in Riang, South Sudan, with high rates of malaria

Médecins Sans Frontières is concerned about the situation in Riang, in Jonglei state, eastern South Sudan, where the health of communities is increasingly at risk.

Sadiya M. with her 1.5 y/o son waiting for treatment in Anka MSF hospital, Zamfara state
10/12/2020

Nigeria: Killings, looting and abductions in Zamfara state

Tens of thousands of people who have been internally displaced by violence and criminal activity in Zamfara struggle to survive each day. There is almost no humanitarian assistance for people left behind in this neglected crisis.

Pediatric ward at Batangafo hospital
17/09/2020

Central African Republic: In times of COVID-19, malaria remains the number one killer of children

During the rainy season, malaria ravages communities that have limited access to healthcare and preventive measures. Every year, we see a spike of malaria cases across MSF´s projects in the Central African Republic

A community health worker carries out malaria test, Kenema
22/06/2020

Responding to COVID-19 must not come at the expense of malaria activities, otherwise children may pay the price

The COVID-19 pandemic is a global tragedy but the consequences for children could be terrible if resources are diverted from malaria prevention and treatment. Carola Buscemi,  a paediatrician working in MSF's Hangha hospital describes the situation in Sierra Leone. 

The road to Metuge is heavily damaged due to the cyclone and rains [MSF-SPAIN]
13/02/2020

Northern Mozambique: Invisible conflict, very real consequences

MSF has been providing healthcare in Cabo Delgado province, one of the poorest and most isolated regions of Mozambique since February 2019. Early activities were rapidly disrupted by Cyclone Kenneth and replaced with emergency response to displacement and cholera. Since then, MSF has been building up healthcare activities. Bruno Cardoso, MSF’s project coordinator, has just returned from Mozambique and tells us more about the situation and what MSF does there.

The queue before distribution at the Tse Lowi displacement site. [Photo: MSF/Solen Mourlon]
10/02/2020

Ituri, Democratic Republic of Congo: Hundreds of thousands uprooted by conflict in desperate need of assistance

Over one million people have been displaced by violence in Ituri since December 2017. About 200.000 are currently living in dire conditions on displaced people sites, in makeshift shelters, lacking food, clean water and access to health care.

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Ethiopia: Tigray Crisis

People have been left without healthcare and tens of thousands have been displaced across Ethiopia and Sudan, following fighting that broke out in the Tigray region of northern Ethiopia, in November 2020.

MSF teams are working on both sides of the border, providing assistance to people in refugees camps in Sudan, and to the displaced and host communities within Tigray in Ethiopia.

 Find out more  

Malaria

Malaria is a deadly disease carried by Anopheles mosquitoes. 
 
Every year, it kills around 660,000 people and infects more than 200 million. Ninety percent of these deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa. 
 
Despite malaria mortality rates falling by 25 percent since 2000, a child in Africa still dies every two minutes from malaria. 
 
Malaria is most common in poor, deprived areas. In many cases, malaria itself is the cause of such poverty: malaria patients are often bedridden and incapable of carrying out normal daily tasks, resulting in burdens on households and health services, and loss of income.  
 
This suffering and loss of life are tragically unnecessary because malaria is largely preventable, detectable and treatable. 
 
While ninety percent of malaria deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa, the disease is present in nearly every tropical area where MSF carries out field programmes: from Ethiopia, Sierra Leone, to Cambodia and Myanmar. 
 
In 2017, MSF treated 2,520,600 cases of malaria.