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Access to healthcare 

Not everything strikes without warning; some disasters are slow. They unfold over decades as a disease affects a population, instability undermines the health system or people are actively excluded from receiving healthcare.

After a rapid emergency subsides people can also find it difficult to access healthcare as the area struggles to recover, the government is overwhelmed by the scale of the problems or new health problems are sparked, such as cholera outbreaks when clean water supplies are disrupted. In these cases, MSF works to give people access to health care and to tackle diseases which need long term treatment, such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and neglected tropical diseases like sleeping sickness.

View of the Central Mosque in Elevage from a classroom that is now home to 3 families
14/10/2021

“My dream is to find a place where we can settle forever”

For close to 20 years, people in the Central African Republic have been suffering from the devastating impact of continuous violence: massive and repeated displacements and atrocities, extremely limited access to essential services, alarming health indicators, repeated reduction of humanitarian access.

01/10/2021

The health benefits of community engagement in northeast DRC

MSF strategy is based on the desire to make the community an actor in the health of its members, and not just a beneficiary.

28/09/2021

South Sudan: MSF brings medical care to remote areas of Maban county

MSF is committed to remain one of the active providers of emergency healthcare across Maban county and in South Sudan as a whole.

21/09/2021

Kusisa: A hospital in the middle of the forest built with and for the community

Three years after the opening of a hospital in the Ziralo area of the South Kivu province, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, MSF ends its support to the Ministry of Health.

Cooking area at Ortese Camp, Benue State © Ghada Safaan/MSF
13/09/2021

“People are suffering”: Displacement continues, leaving hundreds of thousands exposed in Benue State of Nigeria

Persistent and increased violence in the Middle Belt of Nigeria is causing new waves of displacement into informal camps where services and support are non-existent. The newly displaced population is in urgent need of shelter, WASH services, vaccination, and protection. 

MSF staff cares for a new mother at the maternity in Gambella. 2019
10/09/2021

Forced suspension of majority of MSF activities, amid enormous needs in Ethiopia

The international medical humanitarian organisation Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) has suspended all activities in the Amhara, Gambella and Somali regions of Ethiopia, as well as in the west and northwest of Tigray region, to comply with a three-month suspension order from the Ethiopian Agency for Civil Society Organizations (ACSO) on July 30th.

MSF surgical teams perform an operation on a patient injured by the fighting in Kunduz
09/09/2021

Medical care in Kunduz, Afghanistan: Making it work

Fighting in the city of Kunduz in north-eastern Afghanistan ended on 8 August. During the clashes, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) transformed its office space into a temporary trauma unit to treat the people wounded. That unit is now closed and on 16 August all patients were transferred to the nearly-finished Kunduz Trauma Centre that MSF had been building since 2018. The local community still requires trauma care.
A medic in MSF’s Kunduz team describes their experience during the fighting and the work that is going on today.

The Croix des Martyrs IDP camp is home to hundreds of families.
09/09/2021

Haiti: Earthquake survivors need continued care in the south

Though the immediate emergency has subsided many villages and towns still do not have clean water and lack access to functioning health care centers.  MSF teams are  addressing this through water and sanitation activities and mobile clinics to rural areas.

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Access to healthcare 

Not everything strikes without warning; some disasters are slow. They unfold over decades as a disease affects a population, instability undermines the health system or people are actively excluded from receiving healthcare.

After a rapid emergency subsides people can also find it difficult to access healthcare as the area struggles to recover, the government is overwhelmed by the scale of the problems or new health problems are sparked, such as cholera outbreaks when clean water supplies are disrupted. In these cases, MSF works to give people access to health care and to tackle diseases which need long term treatment, such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and neglected tropical diseases like sleeping sickness.