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Access to healthcare 

Not everything strikes without warning; some disasters are slow. They unfold over decades as a disease affects a population, instability undermines the health system or people are actively excluded from receiving healthcare.

After a rapid emergency subsides people can also find it difficult to access healthcare as the area struggles to recover, the government is overwhelmed by the scale of the problems or new health problems are sparked, such as cholera outbreaks when clean water supplies are disrupted. In these cases, MSF works to give people access to health care and to tackle diseases which need long term treatment, such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and neglected tropical diseases like sleeping sickness.

Embedded thumbnail for Somalia: "We haven't had enough time between one disaster and another"
18/11/2022

Somalia: "We haven't had enough time between one disaster and another"

Dr Asma Aweis Abdallah is the medical activity manager with Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) in Baidoa, Somalia. She describes the situation the team is responding to
Embedded thumbnail for Walk through an Ebola treatment centre in Uganda
11/11/2022

Walk through an Ebola treatment centre in Uganda

Watch to see what an Ebola Treatment Centre looks like
04/11/2022

The triple threat of climate change, conflict, and health emergencies: A deadly mix for the most vulnerable in fragile settings

The most affected countries must be supported in meeting the health and humanitarian needs of their people

MSF staff discuss the plans for a 39-bed Ebola Treatment Centre in Mubende [© MSF/Sam Taylor]
25/10/2022

What is MSF doing in Uganda, one month after the declaration of the Ebola epidemic?

As of October 23, 90 patients were confirmed with Ebola and 28 people were reported to have died from the disease

17/10/2022

Djibo, Burkina Faso: “How long do you think a family can survive on 5 kg of rice?”

Without new supplies soon, the town will really be left with nothing. This is why the population needs a humanitarian corridor to be set up now.

MSF Nursing Care Provider Abau Susan issues medication & explains its use to a mother
04/10/2022

MSF hands over medical activities in Greater Mundri to South Sudan’s Ministry of Health

As the situation in the Greater Mundri has stabilised, MSF has now handed over its activities to the Ministry of Health 

29/09/2022

Sudan: Thousands of patients treated at new MSF project in North Darfur’s biggest camp for displaced people

MSF teams are now providing medical consultations to residents of Zamzam camp and El Fasher town 

15/09/2022

MSF support for clinic in South of Khartoum highlights the need for more healthcare facilities

An estimated 1.6 million residents and South Sudanese refugees living in Jebel Aulia locality, south of Khartoum, Sudan, are struggling to access basic healthcare and adequate water and sanitation services, especially during the rainy season.

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Access to healthcare 

Not everything strikes without warning; some disasters are slow. They unfold over decades as a disease affects a population, instability undermines the health system or people are actively excluded from receiving healthcare.

After a rapid emergency subsides people can also find it difficult to access healthcare as the area struggles to recover, the government is overwhelmed by the scale of the problems or new health problems are sparked, such as cholera outbreaks when clean water supplies are disrupted. In these cases, MSF works to give people access to health care and to tackle diseases which need long term treatment, such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and neglected tropical diseases like sleeping sickness.