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Access to Medicines 

One third of the world  lacks access to essential medicines 
 
In the poorest parts of Africa and Asia this figure rises to a half of the population. We challenge the high cost of medicines and the absence of treatment for many of the diseases affecting our patients. 
 
Too often  we cannot treat patients because the medicines are too expensive, or they are no longer produced. 
 
Sometimes, the only drugs we have are highly toxic or ineffective and nobody is looking for a better cure. 
 
As a medical humanitarian organisation, it is fundamentally unacceptable that access to essential medicines is increasingly difficult, particularly for the most common global infectious diseases. 

 

 

 

Round of medical staff in the COVID-19 patients ward.
13/08/2020

Access to coronavirus diagnostic tools is crucial to the response - An example from Cameroon

Five months after confirmation of a first case of coronavirus in Cameroon, we now have a clearer understanding of how COVID-19 has spread through the country and the correct response.  Franck Ale, regional epidemiologist for MSF in Dakar, Senegal and Yap Boum, a representative of Epicentre, MSF’s epidemiology research centre, in Yaoundé, discuss the importance of diagnostic tools to tackle the pandemic.

30/07/2020

No profiteering from COVID-19 test

Cepheid has set the price for each COVID-19 test at US$19.80 in 145 developing countries, including the world’s poorest countries where people live on less than two dollars per day. 

06/07/2020

Johnson & Johnson TB drug price reduction is important step, and governments need to urgently scale up better treatment

Johnson & Johnson has dropped the lowest price of bedaquiline by 32% for countries that buy from the Global Drug Facility, an organisation that supplies TB drugs to people in low and middle income countries.

01/07/2020

African Union says urgent need to address patents and technology barriers for access to future COVID-19 vaccine

MSF welcomes the communique released by African health ministers stating the negative impact patents and other forms of intellectual property could have on access to potential future COVID-19 vaccines in their countries.

23/06/2020

Ahead of Gavi Board meeting, MSF calls on Gavi to revise its global mechanism and demand pharma sell all COVID-19 vaccines at cost

The public pays for the development of COVID-19 vaccines through their taxes, so they deserve transparency on public money that is handed over to pharmaceutical corporations.

IMAGE- Public funding needs strings attached
02/06/2020

Any future COVID-19 vaccines must be sold at cost and accessible to all

Governments must attach strings as they pledge billions to pay for COVID-19 vaccines in developing countries and governments and Gavi must demand pharmaceutical corporations to sell the vaccine at cost.​

Families register for the measles vaccination campaign in the village of Botulu, Boso Manzi health zone
06/05/2020

Democratic Republic of Congo: “COVID-19 must not jeopardise the fight against major killer diseases like measles”

Overshadowed by outbreaks of Ebola last year and by COVID-19 today, the measles epidemic in DRC continues to kill children every day.

27/03/2020

MSF calls for no patents or profiteering on COVID-19 drugs, tests, and vaccines in pandemic

Rationing because of high prices and insufficient supply will prolong the pandemic

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COVID-19 Coronavirus

Most of the world's countries have reported cases of coronavirus disease COVID-19 and MSF teams in over 70 countries are now racing to respond to the pandemic.  

Find out more  

Access to Medicines 

One third of the world  lacks access to essential medicines 
 
In the poorest parts of Africa and Asia this figure rises to a half of the population. We challenge the high cost of medicines and the absence of treatment for many of the diseases affecting our patients. 
 
Too often  we cannot treat patients because the medicines are too expensive, or they are no longer produced. 
 
Sometimes, the only drugs we have are highly toxic or ineffective and nobody is looking for a better cure. 
 
As a medical humanitarian organisation, it is fundamentally unacceptable that access to essential medicines is increasingly difficult, particularly for the most common global infectious diseases.