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Access to Medicines 

One third of the world  lacks access to essential medicines 
 
In the poorest parts of Africa and Asia this figure rises to a half of the population. We challenge the high cost of medicines and the absence of treatment for many of the diseases affecting our patients. 
 
Too often  we cannot treat patients because the medicines are too expensive, or they are no longer produced. 
 
Sometimes, the only drugs we have are highly toxic or ineffective and nobody is looking for a better cure. 
 
As a medical humanitarian organisation, it is fundamentally unacceptable that access to essential medicines is increasingly difficult, particularly for the most common global infectious diseases. 

 

 

 

10/09/2021

4 reasons why Pfizer, BioNTech and Moderna must share COVID-19 mRNA vaccine technology NOW

Imagine the difference it could make if African countries that are facing waves of COVID-19 infections didn't have to rely on imports of vaccines: they could produce them themselves.

13/08/2021

Afghanistan: Injuries and displacement soar as violence spreads around the country

Violence is severely exacerbating people’s access to care. In areas with heavy fighting it is too dangerous for people to leave their homes for medical treatment, or they delay until they are very sick.

23/06/2021

Libya: Recurrent violence against refugees and migrants in Tripoli detention centres forces MSF to suspend activities

Tripoli, Libya, 22 June 2021 – Following repeated incidents of violence towards refugees and migrants held in two detention centres in the Libyan city of Tripoli, international medical organisation Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) announced today that it feels obliged to temporarily suspend its activities in Mabani and Abu Salim detention centres.

22/06/2021

Cameroon: thousands of people continue to be denied urgent and life-saving health care as MSF’s activities in the North-West region remain suspended by the government

Yaoundé, 22 June 2021 – While thousands of people struggle to access vital healthcare in the restive North-West region of Cameroon, Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) is still denied the resumption of its healthcare care services in the region, six months after the forced suspension of its activities by Cameroonian authorities. MSF calls on the government of Cameroon to immediately lift this suspension and prioritize the medical needs of the population.

13/05/2021

100 years after the discovery of insulin, governments and health leaders have a crucial opportunity to support a new global resolution on diabetes and insulin access

MSF calls for ambitious targets for diagnosis, treatment and control of diabetes, in line with the 90-90-90 targets for HIV, and transparency on insulin pricing to ensure affordable access

04/05/2021

Ethiopia: People in rural Tigray hit by impact of crisis and humanitarian neglect

Many of Tigray’s six million people live in mountainous and rural areas where they are all but invisible to the outside world. While teams of aid workers have been deployed to the main cities of this northern Ethiopian region over recent months, aid is failing to reach more remote communities, where the impact of the conflict has often been severe. Many people have been unable to access healthcare and other basic services for the past six months and are still living in fear.

04/05/2021

Burkina Faso: providing healthcare in a region ravaged by violence

Burkina Faso’s North region hosts more than 100,000 internally displaced people who fled recurring violence in this part of the country. Since January 2021, MSF’s mobile teams have been offering healthcare support to people in the villages of Sirfou, Todiame, Rounga and Ouindigui, where thousands of these displaced persons have settled, but where access to healthcare and other basic services is severely limited.

 Mohamed Hussein Bule is a school teacher and refugee living with diabetes in Dadaab camp
14/04/2021

MSF calls on WHO to prioritise supply of more quality-assured sources of insulin

Insulin was discovered 100 years ago, but only half of people requiring it have access to this essential medicine today because of challenging storage requirements, complex treatment protocols and high prices.

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Access to Medicines 

One third of the world  lacks access to essential medicines 
 
In the poorest parts of Africa and Asia this figure rises to a half of the population. We challenge the high cost of medicines and the absence of treatment for many of the diseases affecting our patients. 
 
Too often  we cannot treat patients because the medicines are too expensive, or they are no longer produced. 
 
Sometimes, the only drugs we have are highly toxic or ineffective and nobody is looking for a better cure. 
 
As a medical humanitarian organisation, it is fundamentally unacceptable that access to essential medicines is increasingly difficult, particularly for the most common global infectious diseases.