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COVID-19: What is MSF doing?

MSF teams are racing to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic in the more than 70 countries in which we run programmes, while opening projects in new countries as they become pandemic hotspots.

MSF’s COVID-19 response focuses on three main priorities: supporting health authorities to provide care for patients with COVID-19; protecting people who are vulnerable and at risk; and keeping essential medical services running.

Across our projects, MSF teams have been improving infection prevention and control measures to protect patients and staff and prevent further spread of the coronavirus.  It is absolutely crucial to protect health workers and patients both in COVID-19 care centres and in all other centres providing vital health services, to prevent health facilities from amplifying the pandemic or being forced to close their doors. 

Health systems worldwide are urgently in need of personal protective equipment (PPE) so that essential medical services can stay open.  The global shortage of PPE is indicative of the reality for health workers in most countries where we work, who face shortages of crucial items such as masks and aprons, and medical tools such as tests. Having access to protective equipment, to COVID-19 tests, to oxygen and to drugs for supportive care, becomes more and more urgent as COVID-19 spreads in countries with little access to these tools.

MORE ON OUR WORK ON COVID-19

A health promoter in Martissant , Port-Au-Prince, Haiti © MSF/Lunos Saint-Brave
06/07/2020

Between denial and fears about COVID-19 in Haiti, health promotion on the front line

Health promoters play a key role in responding to people’s concerns in the face of COVID-19 and encourage them to seek timely health care.  Nathalie Destiné Charles, MSF Health Promotion Team Supervisor in Martissant  and Julie Rolinet, MSF Health Promotion Manager in Port-au-Prince describe MSF efforts to increase community engagement with the aim of promoting preventive measures to limit the spread of the disease but also to address rumors and reduce stigmatization.

01/07/2020

African Union says urgent need to address patents and technology barriers for access to future COVID-19 vaccine

MSF welcomes the communique released by African health ministers stating the negative impact patents and other forms of intellectual property could have on access to potential future COVID-19 vaccines in their countries.

01/07/2020

Providing medical care to people who use drugs amid COVID-19 crisis in Kenya

COVID-19 and containment measures put in place to reduce the spread have not boded well for people who use drugs as  most of them live in precarious conditions and are not able to practise some of the preventive measures

23/06/2020

Ahead of Gavi Board meeting, MSF calls on Gavi to revise its global mechanism and demand pharma sell all COVID-19 vaccines at cost

The public pays for the development of COVID-19 vaccines through their taxes, so they deserve transparency on public money that is handed over to pharmaceutical corporations.

A community health worker carries out malaria test, Kenema
22/06/2020

Responding to COVID-19 must not come at the expense of malaria activities, otherwise children may pay the price

The COVID-19 pandemic is a global tragedy but the consequences for children could be terrible if resources are diverted from malaria prevention and treatment. Carola Buscemi,  a paediatrician working in MSF's Hangha hospital describes the situation in Sierra Leone. 

19/06/2020

Misinformation and COVID-19: ‘If there is a false rumour then there may be a sick child suffering in a village’

MSF is extremely concerned about indirect consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic and its potentially devastating effects on child health in Sierra Leone; we cannot allow this pandemic to rob the next generation of their future.

Zacharia Matichiang
18/06/2020

"I would never wish to go back"

35 year old Zacharia Matichiang Maet  has been a refugee since 1987. Currently living in Dadaab Refugee Camp in Kenya, he shares his  challenges and prospects. 

Fowzia Mohamed Abdule outside the maternity ward in Dagahaley
18/06/2020

"How can you stay in a country for three decades but not know where you belong?"

Fowzia Mohamed Abdule came to Dadaab camp in Kenya as a child refugee in 1992. She is now an auxiliary nurse at the MSF hospital maternity ward in Dagahaley Camp and  shares her challenges and hopes  living in a refugee camp

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COVID-19 Coronavirus

Most of the world's countries have reported cases of coronavirus disease COVID-19 and MSF teams in over 70 countries are now racing to respond to the pandemic.  

Find out more  

COVID-19: What is MSF doing?

MSF teams are racing to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic in the more than 70 countries in which we run programmes, while opening projects in new countries as they become pandemic hotspots.

MSF’s COVID-19 response focuses on three main priorities: supporting health authorities to provide care for patients with COVID-19; protecting people who are vulnerable and at risk; and keeping essential medical services running.

Across our projects, MSF teams have been improving infection prevention and control measures to protect patients and staff and prevent further spread of the coronavirus.  It is absolutely crucial to protect health workers and patients both in COVID-19 care centres and in all other centres providing vital health services, to prevent health facilities from amplifying the pandemic or being forced to close their doors. 

Health systems worldwide are urgently in need of personal protective equipment (PPE) so that essential medical services can stay open.  The global shortage of PPE is indicative of the reality for health workers in most countries where we work, who face shortages of crucial items such as masks and aprons, and medical tools such as tests. Having access to protective equipment, to COVID-19 tests, to oxygen and to drugs for supportive care, becomes more and more urgent as COVID-19 spreads in countries with little access to these tools.

MORE ON OUR WORK ON COVID-19