Skip to main content

Newsletter block in header

prev
next

Languages

You are here

COVID-19: What is MSF doing?

MSF teams are racing to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic in the more than 70 countries in which we run programmes, while opening projects in new countries as they become pandemic hotspots.

MSF’s COVID-19 response focuses on three main priorities: supporting health authorities to provide care for patients with COVID-19; protecting people who are vulnerable and at risk; and keeping essential medical services running.

Across our projects, MSF teams have been improving infection prevention and control measures to protect patients and staff and prevent further spread of the coronavirus.  It is absolutely crucial to protect health workers and patients both in COVID-19 care centres and in all other centres providing vital health services, to prevent health facilities from amplifying the pandemic or being forced to close their doors. 

Health systems worldwide are urgently in need of personal protective equipment (PPE) so that essential medical services can stay open.  The global shortage of PPE is indicative of the reality for health workers in most countries where we work, who face shortages of crucial items such as masks and aprons, and medical tools such as tests. Having access to protective equipment, to COVID-19 tests, to oxygen and to drugs for supportive care, becomes more and more urgent as COVID-19 spreads in countries with little access to these tools.

MORE ON OUR WORK ON COVID-19

10/05/2021

It’s not only vaccines: Oxygen must be at the heart of the COVID-19 response

Brussels: In a briefing paper, titled “Gasping For Air”, the international medical humanitarian organisation, Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) highlights the importance of placing medical oxygen supply, not only vaccines and PPE, at the heart of a global COVID-19 response. With vaccines unavailable in the majority of countries worldwide, people will continue to fall ill with COVID-19 and without a significant investment in oxygen infrastructure, those whose illness is severe and who cannot access oxygen will continue to die.

07/05/2021

India: The devastating COVID-19 second wave pushing healthcare provision to the limits in Mumbai

Testimony by Gautam Harigovind, Medical Activity Manager- COVID-19 project, Mumbai

26/04/2021

MSF resumes activities in response to India’s COVID-19 second wave

Delhi, 23 April - Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)/Doctors Without Borders) restarts emergency response amid a surging second wave of COVID-19 in Mumbai in Maharashtra state. The city is very densely populated and the poor and dilapidated hygiene conditions are a triple trigger for the virus to breed, infect and spread rapidly.

MSF supports Emergency Care Units (known locally as UPAs) in Porto Velho, Rondônia state’s capital.MSF supports Emergency Care Units (known locally as UPAs) in Porto Velho, Rondônia state’s capital.
15/04/2021

Failed COVID-19 response drives Brazil to humanitarian catastrophe

Médecins Sans Frontières  is urgently calling on Brazilian authorities to acknowledge the severity of the crisis and to put in place a central COVID-19 response and coordination system to prevent further avoidable deaths.

Mothers during a health promotion sessionat Las Anod hospital in Sool
26/03/2021

Soomaaliya: Kooxaha MSF waxa ay ka jawaabayaan soo labakaclaynta caabuqa COVID-19

Kooxaha MSF waxay taageerayaan wasaaradaha caafimaadka ee Soomaaliya iyo Somaliland oo bukaan ku baaraya goobaha laga soo galo isbitaalada, waxay xoojinayaan talaabooyinka looga hor-tagayo laguna xakameynayo infekshinka, waxayna siinayaan shaqaalaha daryeelka caafimaad ee safka hore qalab ay isaga ilaaliyaan xanuunka. 

Mothers during a health promotion sessionat Las Anod hospital in Sool
26/03/2021

Somalia: MSF teams respond to second wave of COVID-19

MSF teams are supporting ministries of health in Somalia and Somaliland screening patients at entry points of hospitals, strengthening infection prevention and control measures, and providing personal protective equipment to front line health care workers

Catherine Atieno holds up her medication (2011) © Sven Torfinn
24/03/2021

Kenya: Impending stockout of HIV medicines in Homa Bay puts many lives at risk

For the more than 114,000 people living with HIV (PLHIV) currently on treatment in Homa Bay County, impending stockouts risk forcing many to interrupt their treatment, wiping away recent gains in suppressing the deadly infection.

09/03/2021

Countries must stop blocking and move toward formal negotiations on pandemic monopoly waiver at WTO

MSF International President appeals to governments stonewalling on landmark proposal

Pages

Ethiopia: Tigray Crisis

People have been left without healthcare and tens of thousands have been displaced across Ethiopia and Sudan, following fighting that broke out in the Tigray region of northern Ethiopia, in November 2020.

MSF teams are working on both sides of the border, providing assistance to people in refugees camps in Sudan, and to the displaced and host communities within Tigray in Ethiopia.

 Find out more  

COVID-19: What is MSF doing?

MSF teams are racing to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic in the more than 70 countries in which we run programmes, while opening projects in new countries as they become pandemic hotspots.

MSF’s COVID-19 response focuses on three main priorities: supporting health authorities to provide care for patients with COVID-19; protecting people who are vulnerable and at risk; and keeping essential medical services running.

Across our projects, MSF teams have been improving infection prevention and control measures to protect patients and staff and prevent further spread of the coronavirus.  It is absolutely crucial to protect health workers and patients both in COVID-19 care centres and in all other centres providing vital health services, to prevent health facilities from amplifying the pandemic or being forced to close their doors. 

Health systems worldwide are urgently in need of personal protective equipment (PPE) so that essential medical services can stay open.  The global shortage of PPE is indicative of the reality for health workers in most countries where we work, who face shortages of crucial items such as masks and aprons, and medical tools such as tests. Having access to protective equipment, to COVID-19 tests, to oxygen and to drugs for supportive care, becomes more and more urgent as COVID-19 spreads in countries with little access to these tools.

MORE ON OUR WORK ON COVID-19