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Ebola 


Pablo Garrigos/MSF
© Pablo Garrigos/ MSF

Ebola is one of the world’s most deadly diseases. It is a highly infectious virus that can kill up to 90 percent of the people who catch it, which causes huge fear amongst affected communities.   During the world’s largest outbreak of the disease, in West Africa in 2014, MSF medics were at the frontline of the response. Our teams admitted 10,310 patients to our Ebola management centres of which 5,201 were confirmed Ebola cases, representing one-third of all WHO-confirmed cases.  MSF is supporting the Ebola response through patient care in two Ebola Treatment Centres (ETC) in Beni and Goma, numerous decentralised isolation/transit centres, infection prevention and control activities (IPC), community-based surveillance, and implementation of a clinical study for a new Ebola vaccine. MSF’s main priorities are to provide timely health care to Ebola patients, ensure appropriate IPC standards in health care facilities and improve access and quality of primary and secondary health care services based on the assessment of needs of the local community. 

In all our projects, we are striving to put patients and communities first, engaging with the local community and working with existing health centres to identify needs and prioritise activities. In addition to integrated isolation and treatment facilities for suspect Ebola patients, MSF strengthens health care capacities, builds infrastructure for clean water, sanitation and hygiene, and invests in community outreach and health messaging in health centres all over the region.

 MORE ON THE HISTORY, CAUSES AND TREATMENT OF EBOLA


04/09/2020

DRC: Responding to the new Ebola outbreak in Équateur province

Following the declaration of this eleventh Ebola epidemic in the Democratic Republic of Congo, MSF deployed teams to health zones in Équateur province to curb the spread of the disease, support community surveillance and provide rapid treatment to patients living in hard-to-reach areas.

Families register for the measles vaccination campaign in the village of Botulu, Boso Manzi health zone
06/05/2020

Democratic Republic of Congo: “COVID-19 must not jeopardise the fight against major killer diseases like measles”

Overshadowed by outbreaks of Ebola last year and by COVID-19 today, the measles epidemic in DRC continues to kill children every day.

27/03/2020

Coronavirus in West Africa: Focus on the most vulnerable and learning from the past

Today, Sierra Leone remains the only country not  to register COVID-19 cases in West and Central Africa. 

Dr Dorian Job, MSF West Africa Programme Manager in Dakar, provides an update on the situation and priorities at this stage.

Awareness-raising and information activities on Ebola in DRC (© Alexis Huguet)
10/03/2020

Ebola: Reflections after the fire

In the wake of an armed attack on an Ebola treatment centre in Democratic Republic of Congo, aid workers were pushed to radically rethink their approach to the disease. Trish Newport, emergency coordinator for MSF shares her reflections from the response.

ITFC nurse Mary Kainesia
01/02/2020

Sierra Leonean nurses and midwives return with new skills to revitalise health system

Forty-seven nurses and midwives have returned home to Sierra Leone to take up jobs in hospitals and health centres across the country after successfully completing a two-year diploma in Ghana. Their return will boost  efforts to recover from the devastating blow to its health service caused by the 2014-16 Ebola epidemic and by outbreaks of Lassa fever.

Ebola/DRC [Samuel Sieber/MSF]
30/12/2019

Ebola/DRC : MSF stops activities in Biakato due to the presence of armed forces in medical structures

MSF took the difficult decision to stop medical activities in Biakato, in the Ituri province of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Young South Sudanese refugees pose for a photograph in Biringi, Ituri Province, northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo [PHOTO: ALEXIS HUGUET/MSF]
23/12/2019

DRC: Fighting measles in Ebola-affected areas

Dr Nicolas Peyraud, an MSF vaccination referent, has just returned from several assignments in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), where he helped to set up measles vaccination campaigns in collaboration with UNICEF and the Congolese Ministry of Health. In areas also affected by the Ebola outbreak, providing care for children suffering from measles and vaccinating those at risk pose additional challenges for health workers. Dr Peyraud explains these.

New Ebola Vaccine [Photo: Gabriella Bianchi/MSF]
13/11/2019

Ebola in DRC: “We hope this vaccine will give us more options for future outbreaks”

Over the past few weeks preparations for the introduction of a new Ebola vaccine have been underway in two health districts in Goma. Today, the Democratic Republic of Congo’s Ministry of Health announced that vaccination will begin on 14 November.

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COVID-19 Coronavirus

Most of the world's countries have reported cases of coronavirus disease COVID-19 and MSF teams in over 70 countries are now racing to respond to the pandemic.  

Find out more  

Ebola 


Pablo Garrigos/MSF
© Pablo Garrigos/ MSF

Ebola is one of the world’s most deadly diseases. It is a highly infectious virus that can kill up to 90 percent of the people who catch it, which causes huge fear amongst affected communities.   During the world’s largest outbreak of the disease, in West Africa in 2014, MSF medics were at the frontline of the response. Our teams admitted 10,310 patients to our Ebola management centres of which 5,201 were confirmed Ebola cases, representing one-third of all WHO-confirmed cases.  MSF is supporting the Ebola response through patient care in two Ebola Treatment Centres (ETC) in Beni and Goma, numerous decentralised isolation/transit centres, infection prevention and control activities (IPC), community-based surveillance, and implementation of a clinical study for a new Ebola vaccine. MSF’s main priorities are to provide timely health care to Ebola patients, ensure appropriate IPC standards in health care facilities and improve access and quality of primary and secondary health care services based on the assessment of needs of the local community. 

In all our projects, we are striving to put patients and communities first, engaging with the local community and working with existing health centres to identify needs and prioritise activities. In addition to integrated isolation and treatment facilities for suspect Ebola patients, MSF strengthens health care capacities, builds infrastructure for clean water, sanitation and hygiene, and invests in community outreach and health messaging in health centres all over the region.

 MORE ON THE HISTORY, CAUSES AND TREATMENT OF EBOLA