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Epidemics

Millions of people still die each year from infectious diseases that are preventable or can be treated.

Outbreaks of cholera, measles and yellow fever can spread rapidly and be fatal. Malaria is endemic in more than 100 countries. Millions are living with HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis. Viral hemorrhagic diseases such as Ebola or Marburg are rarer, but are potentially fatal.

The people at highest risk are mainly living in poverty or in areas of great instability, such as in armed conflict or during mass displacement, where living conditions are precarious, access to healthcare is limited, and vaccination coverage is low.

Reacting swiftly once an outbreak is identified will ensure that the number of people at risk is quickly reduced, and can significantly impact the number of people falling ill and those dying. Engaging in advocacy to support access to treatment, as in the case of HIV/AIDS and TB, is crucial in pushing for effective responses.

Embedded thumbnail for What is COVID-19 and how can we protect ourselves?
13/03/2020

What is COVID-19 and how can we protect ourselves?

Much remains to be understood about the 2019-nCoV virus, but we know that infection control measures are important for prevention. Dr Armand Sprecher, one of MSF’s Public Health specialists, explains what this means.
15/06/2019

MSF teams responding to the Ebola outbreak in Western Uganda

MSF teams are supporting the Ministry of Health to respond to the outbreak in Uganda, in which three people from the same family have died

13/06/2019

Ebola in DRC: Restoring trust among communities

As the Ebola outbreak in DRC continues, community heath workers for MSF are working to rebuild trust with communities 

17/05/2019

Nigeria: Measles ‘we could not turn away the children.’

In Northeastern Nigeria in the city of Maiduguri, international medical organization, MSF, have treated 2,922 children for the potentially life-threatening disease since November 2018. Children with measles come from internally displaced population and also from the local community.

Uprooted tree on Matemo Island, Cabo Delgado province after passage of Cyclone Kenneth
06/05/2019

Cholera and widespread destruction as second cyclone hits Mozambique

Five weeks after cyclone Idai caused widespread destruction in the Beira region of Mozambique, another Cyclone Kenneth hit the coast of Cabo Delgado province in the northern part of the country.

08/04/2019

Crisis update: MSF's response to Cyclone Idai

MSF emergency teams are responding to the devastating impact of Cyclone Idai in Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe.

29/03/2019

Mapping the needs: new technologies help the emergency response

As well as providing healthcare to people affected by the cyclone and flooding disaster, MSF deployed four GIS (Geographic Information Systems) experts to provide maps to help the humanitarian response. 

29/03/2019

Malawi: “This time around, the destruction is more of houses and farm produce, not of people’s lives”

MSF logistician and community health worker Labana Steven is part of MSF’s emergency team working in Malawi’s Makhanga area to support thousands of people left affected by severe flooding with health and sanitation supplies.  His historical understanding and deep engagement with local partners and communities in southern Malawi are vital to MSF’s ongoing response.

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COVID-19 Coronavirus

Most of the world's countries have reported cases of coronavirus disease COVID-19 and MSF teams in over 70 countries are now racing to respond to the pandemic.  

Find out more  

Epidemics

Millions of people still die each year from infectious diseases that are preventable or can be treated.

Outbreaks of cholera, measles and yellow fever can spread rapidly and be fatal. Malaria is endemic in more than 100 countries. Millions are living with HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis. Viral hemorrhagic diseases such as Ebola or Marburg are rarer, but are potentially fatal.

The people at highest risk are mainly living in poverty or in areas of great instability, such as in armed conflict or during mass displacement, where living conditions are precarious, access to healthcare is limited, and vaccination coverage is low.

Reacting swiftly once an outbreak is identified will ensure that the number of people at risk is quickly reduced, and can significantly impact the number of people falling ill and those dying. Engaging in advocacy to support access to treatment, as in the case of HIV/AIDS and TB, is crucial in pushing for effective responses.