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Malaria

Malaria is a deadly disease carried by Anopheles mosquitoes. 
 
Every year, it kills around 660,000 people and infects more than 200 million. Ninety percent of these deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa. 
 
Despite malaria mortality rates falling by 25 percent since 2000, a child in Africa still dies every two minutes from malaria. 
 
Malaria is most common in poor, deprived areas. In many cases, malaria itself is the cause of such poverty: malaria patients are often bedridden and incapable of carrying out normal daily tasks, resulting in burdens on households and health services, and loss of income.  
 
This suffering and loss of life are tragically unnecessary because malaria is largely preventable, detectable and treatable. 
 
While ninety percent of malaria deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa, the disease is present in nearly every tropical area where MSF carries out field programmes: from Ethiopia, Sierra Leone, to Cambodia and Myanmar. 
 
In 2017, MSF treated 2,520,600 cases of malaria.  

 

18/08/2023

A day in an outreach activity: Triple burden of measles, malaria and malnutrition in a family

In March 2023, Turkana County declared a measles outbreak following the confirmation of cases and since then eight deaths have been reported. Additionally, communities continue to grapple with a persistent malaria outbreak.

Sudanese refugees await consultations in Adre, Chad
14/08/2023

MSF calls for urgent international help for Sudanese refugees in Chad as major crisis looms

More than 358,000 people have sought refuge in camps in eastern Chad but conditions there are entirely inadequate

06/07/2023

Helping tackle malnutrition and malaria in Angola

Malnutrition and malaria are common in remote communities in Angola, especially during peaks of drought and heavy rain. Women and their children are most affected. For the last year, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has collaborated with local health authorities to reduce the burden of these diseases in the provinces of Huíla and Benguela.

15/05/2023

One year on: Soaring needs in Twic County, South Sudan

People living in Twic county suffer from limited access to food, water, sanitation and healthcare

28/04/2023

Madagascar: Struggling to survive a triple crisis

In Madagascar, MSF teams are witnessing an alarming rate of malnutrition in southeastern districts where families are dealing with a triple crisis of food insecurity, malaria, and extreme weather events.

25/04/2023

Malaria in South Sudan – Prevention is an Urgent Task

“Before MSF came, we would use traditional herbs and other healing methods when we got sick. Sometimes it worked, and other times we’d have to endure the pain a while longer.”

13/04/2023

South Sudan: Seeking care sometimes involves great stakes

"During the discussion with his family I learn that the malaria he contracted at the age of two has left him with irreversible brain damage. He no longer recognises his family members and suffers from regular seizures. It was during one of these that he fell into the fire over which the meal was cooking."

29/03/2023

Too young to die

In Kalole, in the east of Democratic Republic of Congo, Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) is working to reduce the mortality rate among children under five.

Pages

Malaria

Malaria is a deadly disease carried by Anopheles mosquitoes. 
 
Every year, it kills around 660,000 people and infects more than 200 million. Ninety percent of these deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa. 
 
Despite malaria mortality rates falling by 25 percent since 2000, a child in Africa still dies every two minutes from malaria. 
 
Malaria is most common in poor, deprived areas. In many cases, malaria itself is the cause of such poverty: malaria patients are often bedridden and incapable of carrying out normal daily tasks, resulting in burdens on households and health services, and loss of income.  
 
This suffering and loss of life are tragically unnecessary because malaria is largely preventable, detectable and treatable. 
 
While ninety percent of malaria deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa, the disease is present in nearly every tropical area where MSF carries out field programmes: from Ethiopia, Sierra Leone, to Cambodia and Myanmar. 
 
In 2017, MSF treated 2,520,600 cases of malaria.