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Malnutrition 

Children will continue to suffer from malnutrition unless access to food increases. Thy can also develop malnutrition as a result of untreated medical conditions such as diarrhoea, measles, HIV or Tuberculosis.  
 
When children suffer from acute malnutrition, their immune systems are so impaired that the risk of death is greatly increased. 
 
According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), malnutrition is the single greatest threat to the world’s public health, with 178 million malnourished children across the globe.  
 
The critical age for malnutrition is from six months – when mothers generally start supplementing breast milk – to 24 months. However, children under five, adolescents, pregnant or breastfeeding women, the elderly and the chronically ill are also vulnerable. 
 
In 2017, MSF admitted 81,300 malnourished children to its feeding programmes. 

 

 

30/09/2021

South Sudan: Flooding puts lives in jeopardy

Heavy rains have caused widespread flooding in South Sudan this year, affecting more than 400,000 people.

29/09/2021

Al-Geneina, West Darfur: Humanitarian aid is being rolled back but the needs remain

Dr Hashim Jama Omer Osman is a Sudanese medical doctor who has worked for MSF since 2013. He spent four years with other INGOs before joining MSF. He has worked across Sudan as well as at MSF projects in Jordan, Nigeria, Somalia and Ethiopia. He is currently MSF’s project medical referent in Al-Geneina.

28/09/2021

South Sudan: MSF brings medical care to remote areas of Maban county

MSF is committed to remain one of the active providers of emergency healthcare across Maban county and in South Sudan as a whole.

06/09/2021

Afghanistan: “Treating patients is our responsibility ”

After months of fighting on the outskirts of Herat in Afghanistan, the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan, also known as the Taliban, took control of the city on August 12. MSF is running an inpatient therapeutic feeding centre (IFTC), a clinic for displaced people, and a COVID-19 treatment centre in Herat. An Afghan MSF medic working in the city describes how we kept services running after the end of the fighting and the new challenges that they and other health services in the area are facing today. 

23/08/2021

Emergency aid in Madagascar resumes as medical staff are grant access

Nine new visas have been provided to our staff thanks to the actions of the authorities. This will allow us to continue our food distributions and treatment of malnourished patients in the districts of Amboasary and Ambovombe.

12/08/2021

Sudan: Urgent measles vaccination and treatment campaign in South Darfur

MSF aims to vaccinate 95% of children between nine months and 15 years old and to provide them with vitamin A supplements as part of its malnutrition prevention and treatment plan.

19/07/2021

Central African Republic: Repeated attacks on medical care leave people vulnerable to disease and death

Over the past six months, MSF teams have witnessed dozens of health facilities ransacked, damaged and occupied by armed men. Armed incursions into hospitals have seen patients subjected to violence, physical abuse, interrogation and arrest.

10/07/2021

Vaccinating more children in Somalia’s Lower Juba region could save thousands from dying of measles

In May 2021, MSF supported Ministry of Health staff to run a month-long measles vaccination campaign in Dhobley, in Somalia’s Lower Juba region.

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Malnutrition 

Children will continue to suffer from malnutrition unless access to food increases. Thy can also develop malnutrition as a result of untreated medical conditions such as diarrhoea, measles, HIV or Tuberculosis.  
 
When children suffer from acute malnutrition, their immune systems are so impaired that the risk of death is greatly increased. 
 
According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), malnutrition is the single greatest threat to the world’s public health, with 178 million malnourished children across the globe.  
 
The critical age for malnutrition is from six months – when mothers generally start supplementing breast milk – to 24 months. However, children under five, adolescents, pregnant or breastfeeding women, the elderly and the chronically ill are also vulnerable. 
 
In 2017, MSF admitted 81,300 malnourished children to its feeding programmes.