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Malnutrition 

Children will continue to suffer from malnutrition unless access to food increases. Thy can also develop malnutrition as a result of untreated medical conditions such as diarrhoea, measles, HIV or Tuberculosis.  
 
When children suffer from acute malnutrition, their immune systems are so impaired that the risk of death is greatly increased. 
 
According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), malnutrition is the single greatest threat to the world’s public health, with 178 million malnourished children across the globe.  
 
The critical age for malnutrition is from six months – when mothers generally start supplementing breast milk – to 24 months. However, children under five, adolescents, pregnant or breastfeeding women, the elderly and the chronically ill are also vulnerable. 
 
In 2017, MSF admitted 81,300 malnourished children to its feeding programmes. 

 

 

The road to Metuge is heavily damaged due to the cyclone and rains [MSF-SPAIN]
13/02/2020

Northern Mozambique: Invisible conflict, very real consequences

MSF has been providing healthcare in Cabo Delgado province, one of the poorest and most isolated regions of Mozambique since February 2019. Early activities were rapidly disrupted by Cyclone Kenneth and replaced with emergency response to displacement and cholera. Since then, MSF has been building up healthcare activities. Bruno Cardoso, MSF’s project coordinator, has just returned from Mozambique and tells us more about the situation and what MSF does there.

The queue before distribution at the Tse Lowi displacement site. [Photo: MSF/Solen Mourlon]
10/02/2020

Ituri, Democratic Republic of Congo: Hundreds of thousands uprooted by conflict in desperate need of assistance

Over one million people have been displaced by violence in Ituri since December 2017. About 200.000 are currently living in dire conditions on displaced people sites, in makeshift shelters, lacking food, clean water and access to health care.

Nutrition assistant prepares a prescription for a woman in Al Kashafa
04/02/2020

Four things you need to know about South Sudanese refugees in Sudan

In December 2019, MSF opened a new 85-bed hospital in White Nile state, Sudan, upgrading the existing services in order to strengthen the quality of healthcare provided to South Sudanese refugees and the local community. The hospital, in Al Kashafa refugee camp, provides primary and secondary healthcare for patients with complicated conditions, including severely malnourished children and people with chronic infectious diseases, such as HIV and tuberculosis (TB).

Al Kashafa Hospital 2020
24/01/2020

New MSF hospital in White Nile state to strengthen the quality of healthcare provided to refugees and local community

Khartoum/Al Kashafa, 23 January 2020 – Today, Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without Borders (MSF) inaugurates a new hospital in Al Kashafa refugee camp, White Nile state, Sudan. The hospital will strengthen the quality of healthcare being provided to South Sudanese refugees and the local community.

Dadaab Overview
18/11/2019

SHUT OUT & FORGOTTEN

Refugees in Dadaab appeal for dignity

Floods in Somalia
06/11/2019

MSF responds to flooding in Somalia

MSF has started doing distribution of tents and kits for cooking, the construction of toilets and to provide safe drinking water.

Flooded areas around Pibor. [Photo: Léo Martine/MSF]
01/11/2019

A state of emergency declared as flooding in South Sudan ensues

The government of South Sudan has declared a state of emergency in 27 flood-affected areas across the country.

29/03/2019

Malawi: “This time around, the destruction is more of houses and farm produce, not of people’s lives”

MSF logistician and community health worker Labana Steven is part of MSF’s emergency team working in Malawi’s Makhanga area to support thousands of people left affected by severe flooding with health and sanitation supplies.  His historical understanding and deep engagement with local partners and communities in southern Malawi are vital to MSF’s ongoing response.

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Malnutrition 

Children will continue to suffer from malnutrition unless access to food increases. Thy can also develop malnutrition as a result of untreated medical conditions such as diarrhoea, measles, HIV or Tuberculosis.  
 
When children suffer from acute malnutrition, their immune systems are so impaired that the risk of death is greatly increased. 
 
According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), malnutrition is the single greatest threat to the world’s public health, with 178 million malnourished children across the globe.  
 
The critical age for malnutrition is from six months – when mothers generally start supplementing breast milk – to 24 months. However, children under five, adolescents, pregnant or breastfeeding women, the elderly and the chronically ill are also vulnerable. 
 
In 2017, MSF admitted 81,300 malnourished children to its feeding programmes.