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Natural disasters 

An earthquake, tsunami, flood or cyclone can have a devastating impact on entire communities.

Within a matter of minutes, natural disasters can affect the lives of tens of thousands of people. Hundreds or even thousands of people can be injured, homes and livelihoods destroyed. Access to clean water, healthcare services and transport can also be disrupted. The impact of each disaster varies greatly and our response must adapt to each situation.

Needs must be quickly identified, but accessing a disaster zone can be complex when roads are cut off. The first responders are people already on-site: community members, local authorities and aid organisations already present.

We keep pre-packaged kits to deploy for rapid relief and life-saving assistance. With projects in over 70 countries, we often have aid workers nearby when a disaster strikes. They can be reinforced with additional teams if a larger response is needed.


An MSF tent hospital set up after the earthquake in Nepal in 2016  ©Emily Lynch

 

25/11/2021

South Sudan: Severe floods and lacklustre humanitarian response leave people dangerously exposed in Bentiu

The dangerously slow and inadequate humanitarian response is putting lives at risk

21/10/2021

MSF warns of health and humanitarian impacts of climate change in new 2021 Lancet Countdown Report

After years of witnessing how climate change has likely exacerbated health and humanitarian crises in multiple contexts where we work, we are compelled to speak out about what we see. 

30/09/2021

South Sudan: Flooding puts lives in jeopardy

Heavy rains have caused widespread flooding in South Sudan this year, affecting more than 400,000 people.

The Croix des Martyrs IDP camp is home to hundreds of families.
09/09/2021

Haiti: Earthquake survivors need continued care in the south

Though the immediate emergency has subsided many villages and towns still do not have clean water and lack access to functioning health care centers.  MSF teams are  addressing this through water and sanitation activities and mobile clinics to rural areas.

28/08/2021

Haiti: After the earthquake, a multitude of challenges for patients

MSF has erected a tent in the hospital compound for discharged patients who cannot stay elsewhere.

23/08/2021

Haiti: After the earthquake, a surgical team works nonstop

Xavier Kernizan is an orthopedic surgeon who normally works at MSF's Tabarre hospital in Port-au-Prince. Since the August 14 earthquake, he has been working with an MSF surgical team in Jérémie.

17/08/2021

From reactive to proactive: how MSF in Beira is stepping up its disaster response preparations

Natural disasters, such as floods, cyclones, drought and earthquakes, have had a significant impact on Mozambique’s people. Cyclone Idai made landfall in the eastern city of Beira, the capital of Sofala province, on 14 March 2019. Within days it had reduced 80 per cent of the city to ruins and left over 600 people dead and more than 1,600 injured.

17/08/2021

Haiti Earthquake: MSF responding to urgent medical needs

A 7.2 magnitude earthquake caused severe damage to buildings, houses and main access roads in the three provinces of Grand'Anse, Nippes and Sud. The provisional death toll is estimated at more than 1,300 with more than 5,700 people injured, according to Haitian authorities.

Pages

Natural disasters 

An earthquake, tsunami, flood or cyclone can have a devastating impact on entire communities.

Within a matter of minutes, natural disasters can affect the lives of tens of thousands of people. Hundreds or even thousands of people can be injured, homes and livelihoods destroyed. Access to clean water, healthcare services and transport can also be disrupted. The impact of each disaster varies greatly and our response must adapt to each situation.

Needs must be quickly identified, but accessing a disaster zone can be complex when roads are cut off. The first responders are people already on-site: community members, local authorities and aid organisations already present.

We keep pre-packaged kits to deploy for rapid relief and life-saving assistance. With projects in over 70 countries, we often have aid workers nearby when a disaster strikes. They can be reinforced with additional teams if a larger response is needed.


An MSF tent hospital set up after the earthquake in Nepal in 2016  ©Emily Lynch