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Natural disasters 

An earthquake, tsunami, flood or cyclone can have a devastating impact on entire communities.

Within a matter of minutes, natural disasters can affect the lives of tens of thousands of people. Hundreds or even thousands of people can be injured, homes and livelihoods destroyed. Access to clean water, healthcare services and transport can also be disrupted. The impact of each disaster varies greatly and our response must adapt to each situation.

Needs must be quickly identified, but accessing a disaster zone can be complex when roads are cut off. The first responders are people already on-site: community members, local authorities and aid organisations already present.

We keep pre-packaged kits to deploy for rapid relief and life-saving assistance. With projects in over 70 countries, we often have aid workers nearby when a disaster strikes. They can be reinforced with additional teams if a larger response is needed.


An MSF tent hospital set up after the earthquake in Nepal in 2016  ©Emily Lynch

 

19/05/2022

Kenya: Urgent humanitarian response required to address rising malnutrition cases in Marsabit

In north-eastern parts of Kenya, an ongoing drought rages following three consecutive seasons of failed rains, making an already dire food insecurity situation worse.

18/05/2022

A month after the KwaZulu-Natal flash floods, Doctors Without Borders thinks people should be aware of these three issues

MSF team has been on the ground assisting the most vulnerable communities.

People displaced by Tropical Cyclone Ana in Bangula, Nsanje district at Bangula ADMARC
11/02/2022

After flooding, displaced Malawians are living in dire conditions

152,000 internally displaced people are now spread across 178 displacement camps in southern Malawi and are in desperate need of assistance.
 

18/01/2022

The Philippines: MSF launches intervention on islands affected by Typhoon Rai

MSF emergency teams will start providing medical and humanitarian assistance to communities on the remote islands of Dinagat, Siargao and other outlying areas, some of the worst affected by Typhoon Rai.

A man drags a tarpaulin raft through the flood in Rubkona, Unity State. ©  Sean Sutton
07/01/2022

South Sudan: Hundreds of thousands still living in precarious conditions months after floods

Eight months since the beginning of the flooding, people in Unity State are still facing precarious living conditions and are at risk of outbreaks of infectious and waterborne diseases, increased food insecurity and malnutrition

25/11/2021

South Sudan: Severe floods and lacklustre humanitarian response leave people dangerously exposed in Bentiu

The dangerously slow and inadequate humanitarian response is putting lives at risk

21/10/2021

MSF warns of health and humanitarian impacts of climate change in new 2021 Lancet Countdown Report

After years of witnessing how climate change has likely exacerbated health and humanitarian crises in multiple contexts where we work, we are compelled to speak out about what we see. 

Pages

Natural disasters 

An earthquake, tsunami, flood or cyclone can have a devastating impact on entire communities.

Within a matter of minutes, natural disasters can affect the lives of tens of thousands of people. Hundreds or even thousands of people can be injured, homes and livelihoods destroyed. Access to clean water, healthcare services and transport can also be disrupted. The impact of each disaster varies greatly and our response must adapt to each situation.

Needs must be quickly identified, but accessing a disaster zone can be complex when roads are cut off. The first responders are people already on-site: community members, local authorities and aid organisations already present.

We keep pre-packaged kits to deploy for rapid relief and life-saving assistance. With projects in over 70 countries, we often have aid workers nearby when a disaster strikes. They can be reinforced with additional teams if a larger response is needed.


An MSF tent hospital set up after the earthquake in Nepal in 2016  ©Emily Lynch