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Natural disasters 

An earthquake, tsunami, flood or cyclone can have a devastating impact on entire communities.

Within a matter of minutes, natural disasters can affect the lives of tens of thousands of people. Hundreds or even thousands of people can be injured, homes and livelihoods destroyed. Access to clean water, healthcare services and transport can also be disrupted. The impact of each disaster varies greatly and our response must adapt to each situation.

Needs must be quickly identified, but accessing a disaster zone can be complex when roads are cut off. The first responders are people already on-site: community members, local authorities and aid organisations already present.

We keep pre-packaged kits to deploy for rapid relief and life-saving assistance. With projects in over 70 countries, we often have aid workers nearby when a disaster strikes. They can be reinforced with additional teams if a larger response is needed.


An MSF tent hospital set up after the earthquake in Nepal in 2016  ©Emily Lynch

 

08/01/2021

CYCLONE GATI WREAKS HAVOC ON THE COAST OF PUNTLAND, SOMALIA

MSF partners with local health authorities to assist displaced families in Bosaso city

21/12/2020

South Sudan: MSF shifts focus to respond to health needs in the Greater Pibor Administrative Area

After 15 years working in the area, MSF will close its project in Pibor town but remain in the Greater Pibor Administrative area for emergencies

A woman carries tree branches to construct a new house in Pibor town
22/10/2020

South Sudan: Severe flooding worsens in many areas, raising health risks

The needs for medical care are increasing with a sharp rise in malaria cases and fears of outbreaks of other diseases.

Trucks loaded with NFI kits
29/09/2020

Sudan: Médecins Sans Frontières launches response to assist people impacted by the floods in Khartoum and Sennar States

MSF teams are working closely with local authorities to reach people affected by floods in Khartoum and the State of Sennar

Flooding in the Greater Pibor Administrative Area
22/09/2020

South Sudan: Heavy floods threaten the lives of thousands of people in Greater Pibor Administrative Area

Swollen rivers and flooding are sweeping through communities in the Greater Upper Nile region at an alarming speed, for the second year in a row.  Thousands of people have been displaced and the floods have worsened an already devastating humanitarian emergency. 

A woman fetching water from an MSF water point, in the town of Pibor, Boma state, South Sudan
23/12/2019

“You use what you have, as best you can.”

In early December logistician Karla Claus finished two years of back-to-back missions with Médecins Sans  Frontières/Doctors  Without  Borders(MSF).  In that time,  her work took  Karla  across  South Sudan,  a  country with no shortage of challenges and crises. Here she reflects on her recent assignment as part of the emergency response to the severe flooding that South Sudan has faced since July. 

Villagers surrounded by water & stranded in a shrinking area of dry land
05/12/2019

South Sudan: “People tell us these are the worst floods they have ever seen”

Kim Phillips, logistics coordinator in South Sudan describes the flooding situation 

Mohamed Kalil is MSF’s humanitarian affairs advisor [Photo: Abdalle Mumin/MSF]
19/11/2019

Somalia: “Floods have left people so vulnerable that it’s a dilemma to decide whose needs are the greatest”

Mohamed Kalil is MSF’s humanitarian affairs advisor for Somalia and Somaliland. He has been working for the organisation for over a decade and was part of the first emergency team deployed in Beledweyne to respond to the flood crisis. Now back from the field, he shares his experience.

Pages

Natural disasters 

An earthquake, tsunami, flood or cyclone can have a devastating impact on entire communities.

Within a matter of minutes, natural disasters can affect the lives of tens of thousands of people. Hundreds or even thousands of people can be injured, homes and livelihoods destroyed. Access to clean water, healthcare services and transport can also be disrupted. The impact of each disaster varies greatly and our response must adapt to each situation.

Needs must be quickly identified, but accessing a disaster zone can be complex when roads are cut off. The first responders are people already on-site: community members, local authorities and aid organisations already present.

We keep pre-packaged kits to deploy for rapid relief and life-saving assistance. With projects in over 70 countries, we often have aid workers nearby when a disaster strikes. They can be reinforced with additional teams if a larger response is needed.


An MSF tent hospital set up after the earthquake in Nepal in 2016  ©Emily Lynch