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Natural disasters 

An earthquake, tsunami, flood or cyclone can have a devastating impact on entire communities.

Within a matter of minutes, natural disasters can affect the lives of tens of thousands of people. Hundreds or even thousands of people can be injured, homes and livelihoods destroyed. Access to clean water, healthcare services and transport can also be disrupted. The impact of each disaster varies greatly and our response must adapt to each situation.

Needs must be quickly identified, but accessing a disaster zone can be complex when roads are cut off. The first responders are people already on-site: community members, local authorities and aid organisations already present.

We keep pre-packaged kits to deploy for rapid relief and life-saving assistance. With projects in over 70 countries, we often have aid workers nearby when a disaster strikes. They can be reinforced with additional teams if a larger response is needed.


An MSF tent hospital set up after the earthquake in Nepal in 2016  ©Emily Lynch

 

Floods in Somalia
06/11/2019

MSF responds to flooding in Somalia

MSF has started doing distribution of tents and kits for cooking, the construction of toilets and to provide safe drinking water.

Flooded areas around Pibor. [Photo: Léo Martine/MSF]
01/11/2019

A state of emergency declared as flooding in South Sudan ensues

The government of South Sudan has declared a state of emergency in 27 flood-affected areas across the country.

Embedded thumbnail for Treating People Amid Flood Disaster in South Sudan
01/11/2019

Treating People Amid Flood Disaster in South Sudan

The government of South Sudan declared a state of emergency on October 30 in response to widespread flooding. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams are active across the country, including in Pibor, an eastern town that is almost completely submerged.
On an aerial assessment from Bor to Pibor, areas can be seen completely submerged by flooding.
28/10/2019

South Sudan: “The only way to move around the hospital now is by boat”

MSF medical team leader Benedetta Capelli is just back from Pibor, in South Sudan, where rising floodwaters have engulfed MSF’s hospital and much of the surrounding area. She spoke to us on 24 October 2019. 
 

On an aerial assessment from Gumuruk to Lekongole, where MSF runs two primary healthcare units, people can be seen moving via canoes as their tukuls are completely submerged.
21/10/2019

Severe flooding in South Sudan: MSF assessing emergency needs in affected locations

Severe flooding has left thousands of people stranded in inaccessible areas in the east and north east of South Sudan , threatening to make worse an already catastrophic humanitarian crisis.

Boat with NFI items on its way to Chibuabuabua, Savane, in Dondo District.Giuseppe La Rosa/MSF
30/05/2019

“Beneath the waters, you will find us”

A. is a 26-year-old nurse working with MSF in Mozambique. She and her children survived Cyclone Idai, but her husband was killed. Despite the tragedy, she cares for patients in the most remote areas of Mozambique, in communities devasted by the effects of the cyclone. This is her story.

A road in Zimbabwe has been partly washed away following devastation caused by Cyclone Idai, 15 March 2019.
10/05/2019

Cyclones and flooding in Mozambique and southern Africa

Hear the latest from MSF's emergency teams in Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe.

Uprooted tree on Matemo Island, Cabo Delgado province after passage of Cyclone Kenneth
06/05/2019

Cholera and widespread destruction as second cyclone hits Mozambique

Five weeks after cyclone Idai caused widespread destruction in the Beira region of Mozambique, another Cyclone Kenneth hit the coast of Cabo Delgado province in the northern part of the country.

Pages

Natural disasters 

An earthquake, tsunami, flood or cyclone can have a devastating impact on entire communities.

Within a matter of minutes, natural disasters can affect the lives of tens of thousands of people. Hundreds or even thousands of people can be injured, homes and livelihoods destroyed. Access to clean water, healthcare services and transport can also be disrupted. The impact of each disaster varies greatly and our response must adapt to each situation.

Needs must be quickly identified, but accessing a disaster zone can be complex when roads are cut off. The first responders are people already on-site: community members, local authorities and aid organisations already present.

We keep pre-packaged kits to deploy for rapid relief and life-saving assistance. With projects in over 70 countries, we often have aid workers nearby when a disaster strikes. They can be reinforced with additional teams if a larger response is needed.


An MSF tent hospital set up after the earthquake in Nepal in 2016  ©Emily Lynch