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Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is a deadly infectious disease. 
 
Each year TB kills 1.8 million people with nearly another nine million suffering from the disease, mainly in developing countries.
 
TB is the major killer of people living with HIV in Africa. Almost half a million people develop multi drug-resistant strains of the disease every year.
TB is often thought of as a disease of the past but a recent resurgence and the spread of drug-resistant forms makes it very much an issue of the present day and age. Today, TB is one of the three main killer infectious diseases, along with malaria and HIV/AIDS.
 
Though the global death rate from TB dropped more than 40 percent in in the years between 1990 and 2011, there are still crucial gaps in coverage and severe shortcomings when it comes to diagnostics and care options.
Furthermore, we are currently seeing an alarming rise in cases of drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB and MDR-TB) that do not respond to the customary first-line drugs.
MSF has been fighting TB for over 30 years. We provide treatment for the disease in many different contexts, from chronic conflict situations, such as Sudan, to vulnerable patients in stable settings such as Uzbekistan and the Russian Federation.
 
In 2017 MSF treated 18,500 patients on first line treatment for TB, and 3,600 patients on treatment for multidrug resistant TB. 
 
Declared cured a patient is leaving to go home. Follow-up testing will confirm no relapse
26/04/2022

Healing from DR-TB, despite long distances and numerous challenges

Treatment of drug-resistant TB can be extremely difficult - lasting up to 20 months for some patients and requiring daily trips to TB centers for medication 

31/03/2022

Khayelitsha, South Africa: MSF family-centred TB approach informs new WHO guidance on caring for children with drug-resistant TB.

New guidance released on World TB day by the World Health Organization (WHO) is recommending, for the first time, that children with TB and DR-TB be cared for in their communities, instead of in hospitals.

in Makeni Correctional Centre in Sierra Leone during a screening session for TB with an inmate in th
24/03/2022

Sierra Leone’s first outpatient model of care for drug-resistant tuberculosis allows patients to stay in the community

In cooperation with Sierra Leone’s National Tuberculosis Programme, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is providing care to patients with drug-sensitive and drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Bombali district. An outpatient model of care allows patients for the first time to start and continue their treatment at home.

21/10/2021

Innovative worldwide clinical trial for multidrug - resistant tuberculosis completes enrollment

New clinical trial compares five new treatment regimens for treating MDR-TB containing two of the three new TB drugs developed in recent years, bedaquiline and delamanid, in combination with other existing oral TB drugs.

15/06/2021

MSF: Governments off track on providing tools to prevent TB, the second biggest infectious disease killer after COVID-19

Geneva, 15 June 2021 – As the World Health Organization (WHO) convenes a ‘call to action’ tomorrow on the need to scale up access to preventive treatment for tuberculosis (TB), the international medical humanitarian organisation Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) urged all governments to support and ramp up the implementation of TB preventive treatment (TPT), and demanded that pharmaceutical and diagnostics corporations make all drugs and tests needed to implement TPT accessible and affordable for those in need

23/03/2021

Hagaajinta daryeelka dadka qaba cudurka qaaxada ee daawada u adkaysta Somaliland iyo Puntland

MSF waxay bilowday inay ka taageerto Wasaaradda Horumarinta Caafimaadka Somaliland (MoHD) baaritaanka iyo daaweynta cudurka qaaxada ee daawada u adkeysta (DR-TB) sanadkii 2019. Maanta, MSF waxay ku bixineysaa taageero caafimaad iyo farsamo isbitaalka qaaxada ee ku yaala Hargeysa iyo seddex xarumood oo qaaxada heer gobol ah oo ku kala yaal Boorama, Berbera iyo Burco. . Illaa iyo hadda, 96 bukaan ah oo qaba DR-TB ayaa lagu daweeyay qorshahan, 39 ka mid ah ayaa dhammaystay daaweyntoodii.

Hargeisa, Somaliland, hosts approximately 100,000 people displaced by conflicts and droughts in the
23/03/2021

Improving care for people with drug-resistant tuberculosis in Somaliland and Puntland

MSF and Somaliland's Ministry of Health and Development are enrolling new DR-TB patients in an updated, shorter oral treatment regimen with bedaquiline that is easier for patients to complete

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Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is a deadly infectious disease. 
 
Each year TB kills 1.8 million people with nearly another nine million suffering from the disease, mainly in developing countries.
 
TB is the major killer of people living with HIV in Africa. Almost half a million people develop multi drug-resistant strains of the disease every year.
TB is often thought of as a disease of the past but a recent resurgence and the spread of drug-resistant forms makes it very much an issue of the present day and age. Today, TB is one of the three main killer infectious diseases, along with malaria and HIV/AIDS.
 
Though the global death rate from TB dropped more than 40 percent in in the years between 1990 and 2011, there are still crucial gaps in coverage and severe shortcomings when it comes to diagnostics and care options.
Furthermore, we are currently seeing an alarming rise in cases of drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB and MDR-TB) that do not respond to the customary first-line drugs.
MSF has been fighting TB for over 30 years. We provide treatment for the disease in many different contexts, from chronic conflict situations, such as Sudan, to vulnerable patients in stable settings such as Uzbekistan and the Russian Federation.
 
In 2017 MSF treated 18,500 patients on first line treatment for TB, and 3,600 patients on treatment for multidrug resistant TB.