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War and conflict 

In war zones, MSF does not take sides. We provide medical care based on needs alone and work hard to try and reach the people who need help the most. 

If warring parties see aid organisations as being on one side of a conflict, we are less likely to gain access to those in need and more likely to be attacked. 
 
One of the ways in which we are able to demonstrate our independence to warring parties is to ensure that all our funding for work in conflicts comes from private individuals – we do not accept government grants. 
 
Conflicts, be they international wars or those within countries, can have many consequences. 
 
Fear of violence or persecution uproots entire communities and disrupts access to medical care for those that flee as well as those who stay behind.  
 
Conflicts normally lead to a rise in trauma injuries, but also lead to problems for people needing normal medical care, such as for complications with pregnancy or chronic diseases such as diabetes.  
 
Psychological distress and mental illnesses also generally rise, as can cases of sexual violence.  
 
We try to fill these gaps with highly experienced doctors, nurses, and logisticians, who provide specialised medical care and logistical support. 

08/11/2022

North Kivu: Tens of thousands need aid urgently just outside Goma

MSF has been working in Kanyaruchinya since last July, supporting the centre to enable the provision of free and quality healthcare to displaced people, people displaced by the volcanic eruption, and all the inhabitants of the area.

28/10/2022

Violence in Mai-Ndombe and Kwilu provinces (DRC): the lack of humanitarian response raises serious concerns

Following an outbreak of violence in the provinces of Mai-Ndombe and Kwilu in August, MSF head of mission Alessandra Giudiceandrea spent several weeks in the region as part of MSF’s emergency response. She describes her shock at witnessing the aftermath of the violence, her frustration at the difficulties of mobilising other humanitarian organisations, and her unease at the security-based approach to resolving this crisis.

19/10/2022

Conflict in Greater Upper Nile is impeding humanitarian aid to thousands of people already devastated by flooding

MSF calls on all warring groups to provide assurances of safety for humanitarian access to enable organisations to deliver medical services and distribute aid to prevent more deaths and suffering of innocent civilians.

MSF Nursing Care Provider Abau Susan issues medication & explains its use to a mother
04/10/2022

MSF hands over medical activities in Greater Mundri to South Sudan’s Ministry of Health

As the situation in the Greater Mundri has stabilised, MSF has now handed over its activities to the Ministry of Health 

26/07/2022

On the visit of the president of MSF Spain to Ethiopia

Flashquote attributable to Ms Paula Gil, President of MSF Spain

MOH staff at the hospital during a malnutrition screening in Dupti hospital, Afar.
09/06/2022

MSF raises alert over alarming indications of large-scale nutritional crisis in Ethiopia's Afar region

Many people in Afar cannot access the very minimum levels of healthcare, food and water necessary to sustain human life

06/06/2022

“I don’t feel heartache, it’s deep in my soul” – The mental health needs in Ukraine

MSF teams are seeing a spectrum of mental health problems in people as a result of the war 

IDPs in Kinoni school - about 350 families found refuge here
03/06/2022

North Kivu: Tens of thousands of people displaced by new wave of violence

People are living in very precarious conditions, with no proper shelter, limited access to clean water and lack of food

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War and conflict 

In war zones, MSF does not take sides. We provide medical care based on needs alone and work hard to try and reach the people who need help the most. 

If warring parties see aid organisations as being on one side of a conflict, we are less likely to gain access to those in need and more likely to be attacked. 
 
One of the ways in which we are able to demonstrate our independence to warring parties is to ensure that all our funding for work in conflicts comes from private individuals – we do not accept government grants. 
 
Conflicts, be they international wars or those within countries, can have many consequences. 
 
Fear of violence or persecution uproots entire communities and disrupts access to medical care for those that flee as well as those who stay behind.  
 
Conflicts normally lead to a rise in trauma injuries, but also lead to problems for people needing normal medical care, such as for complications with pregnancy or chronic diseases such as diabetes.  
 
Psychological distress and mental illnesses also generally rise, as can cases of sexual violence.  
 
We try to fill these gaps with highly experienced doctors, nurses, and logisticians, who provide specialised medical care and logistical support.