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War and conflict 

In war zones, MSF does not take sides. We provide medical care based on needs alone and work hard to try and reach the people who need help the most. 

If warring parties see aid organisations as being on one side of a conflict, we are less likely to gain access to those in need and more likely to be attacked. 
 
One of the ways in which we are able to demonstrate our independence to warring parties is to ensure that all our funding for work in conflicts comes from private individuals – we do not accept government grants. 
 
Conflicts, be they international wars or those within countries, can have many consequences. 
 
Fear of violence or persecution uproots entire communities and disrupts access to medical care for those that flee as well as those who stay behind.  
 
Conflicts normally lead to a rise in trauma injuries, but also lead to problems for people needing normal medical care, such as for complications with pregnancy or chronic diseases such as diabetes.  
 
Psychological distress and mental illnesses also generally rise, as can cases of sexual violence.  
 
We try to fill these gaps with highly experienced doctors, nurses, and logisticians, who provide specialised medical care and logistical support. 

The entrance to the Bambari hospital
22/02/2021

Central African Republic: Women, children wounded and medical centre hit by violent clashes in Bambari

Constant tensions and fighting deeply impact an already vulnerable and traumatised population hard-hit by years of civil war, a chronic medical crisis, and therefore extremely limited access to healthcare

Tsgay and her daughter Dalina at Hamdayet
19/02/2021

For refugees in Hamdayet, Sudan, “everyone is hungry, and everyone is tired”

The current situation in Hamdayet has only created more frustrations, anxiety and fear for refugees fleeing violence in Tigray, Ethiopia and is having a detrimental impact on their health. 

Embedded thumbnail for Ethiopia: MSF supports local healthcare facilities in Tigray
05/02/2021

Ethiopia: MSF supports local healthcare facilities in Tigray

Since violence broke out in Tigray in northern Ethiopia in early November, some 60,000 people have taken refuge in Sudan and hundreds of thousands have been displaced.Albert Viñas has been involved in almost 50 emergency responses with Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors without Borders (MSF) over 20 years. He has just returned from his sixth mission in Ethiopia, where his role was to prepare the way for medical teams to access areas of eastern and central Tigray and assist people affected by the current crisis. He describes what he found.
IDPs in Katasomwa
28/01/2021

South Kivu: An endless flight

In the last two years, the unrest ravaging eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo has forced many thousands of people to flee their homes. Many have found refuge on the other side of the border between North and South Kivu, where they share limited resources and land with equally vulnerable populations.

About 8,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) are now living in dire conditions in makeshift camps
26/01/2021

Extremely precarious living conditions for the displaced people of Bouar, Central African Republic

Displaced people in Bouar are facing an unprecedented crisis and an effective and coordinated humanitarian response is urgently needed

21/01/2021

Yemen: “These sanctions have to make clear that they do not apply to humanitarian aid”

The United States government has moved to designate Ansar Allah, the Yemeni group that controls Sana’a and much of the country, as a “foreign terrorist organisation”, meaning that sanctions will be applied to stop people and companies working with them or the institutions they control.

Marc Schakal, MSF’s Program Manager for Yemen, explains what the risks are for aid to Yemen – and the Yemeni people – if there is not a broad exemption allowing humanitarian work to continue under these sanctions.

MSF team set-up a mobile clinic in Riang, Jonglei state.
19/01/2021

MSF emergency team responds to worrying health needs in Riang, South Sudan, with high rates of malaria

Médecins Sans Frontières is concerned about the situation in Riang, in Jonglei state, eastern South Sudan, where the health of communities is increasingly at risk.

15/01/2021

Central African Republic: MSF teams ramp up support as violence escalates

The security and humanitarian situation is deteriorating rapidly in Central African Republic, according to reports by MSF teams, as clashes escalate between coalition armed groups and government forces supported by foreign troops, in violence linked to the electoral process.

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War and conflict 

In war zones, MSF does not take sides. We provide medical care based on needs alone and work hard to try and reach the people who need help the most. 

If warring parties see aid organisations as being on one side of a conflict, we are less likely to gain access to those in need and more likely to be attacked. 
 
One of the ways in which we are able to demonstrate our independence to warring parties is to ensure that all our funding for work in conflicts comes from private individuals – we do not accept government grants. 
 
Conflicts, be they international wars or those within countries, can have many consequences. 
 
Fear of violence or persecution uproots entire communities and disrupts access to medical care for those that flee as well as those who stay behind.  
 
Conflicts normally lead to a rise in trauma injuries, but also lead to problems for people needing normal medical care, such as for complications with pregnancy or chronic diseases such as diabetes.  
 
Psychological distress and mental illnesses also generally rise, as can cases of sexual violence.  
 
We try to fill these gaps with highly experienced doctors, nurses, and logisticians, who provide specialised medical care and logistical support.