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War and conflict 

In war zones, MSF does not take sides. We provide medical care based on needs alone and work hard to try and reach the people who need help the most. 

If warring parties see aid organisations as being on one side of a conflict, we are less likely to gain access to those in need and more likely to be attacked. 
 
One of the ways in which we are able to demonstrate our independence to warring parties is to ensure that all our funding for work in conflicts comes from private individuals – we do not accept government grants. 
 
Conflicts, be they international wars or those within countries, can have many consequences. 
 
Fear of violence or persecution uproots entire communities and disrupts access to medical care for those that flee as well as those who stay behind.  
 
Conflicts normally lead to a rise in trauma injuries, but also lead to problems for people needing normal medical care, such as for complications with pregnancy or chronic diseases such as diabetes.  
 
Psychological distress and mental illnesses also generally rise, as can cases of sexual violence.  
 
We try to fill these gaps with highly experienced doctors, nurses, and logisticians, who provide specialised medical care and logistical support. 

MOH staff at the hospital during a malnutrition screening in Dupti hospital, Afar.
09/06/2022

MSF raises alert over alarming indications of large-scale nutritional crisis in Ethiopia's Afar region

Many people in Afar cannot access the very minimum levels of healthcare, food and water necessary to sustain human life

06/06/2022

“I don’t feel heartache, it’s deep in my soul” – The mental health needs in Ukraine

MSF teams are seeing a spectrum of mental health problems in people as a result of the war 

IDPs in Kinoni school - about 350 families found refuge here
03/06/2022

North Kivu: Tens of thousands of people displaced by new wave of violence

People are living in very precarious conditions, with no proper shelter, limited access to clean water and lack of food

Mariam gave birth to her son Isyaka while fleeing her village,
23/05/2022

Violence and displacement in Ippy mirror people’s daily reality in CAR

Far from international media attention, armed violence continues to rage in many parts of the Central African Republic (CAR), forcing entire communities from their homes and onto a path of death and despair.

03/05/2022

Haiti: In Port-au-Prince, the population suffers as armed clashes spread

For the past week, violent clashes have been taking place in Port-au-Prince, including in usually calm neighborhoods. Mumuza Muhindo, MSF head of mission, explains how people in the city are victims of the violence in this Q & A.

Mobile clinic in Kreneik, the latest MSF intervention before the violence re-started
29/04/2022

Sudan: Violent attacks leave tens of thousands in West Darfur without access to healthcare

Violent attacks in and around Kreneik town and fighting in El Genina, in West Darfur, leaving wounded and sick people in desperate need without access to lifesaving medical care

13/04/2022

Finding the most useful role – MSF’s response in and around Ukraine

We have identified several key areas where our humanitarian and medical support can be of real, practical and sometimes directly lifesaving benefit.

During a one-day visit the team carried out consultations with 39 patients
08/04/2022

Mozambique: MSF will adapt critical healthcare in Mocímboa da Praia as people return home

Luis Montiel is emergency coordinator with Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) working in Cabo Delgado, a northern province in Mozambique affected by ongoing conflict since 2017. In early April, Montiel led an MSF team which briefly visited Mocímboa da Praia to run some medical activities for the first time since the violence abruptly hit this coastal town two years ago.

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War and conflict 

In war zones, MSF does not take sides. We provide medical care based on needs alone and work hard to try and reach the people who need help the most. 

If warring parties see aid organisations as being on one side of a conflict, we are less likely to gain access to those in need and more likely to be attacked. 
 
One of the ways in which we are able to demonstrate our independence to warring parties is to ensure that all our funding for work in conflicts comes from private individuals – we do not accept government grants. 
 
Conflicts, be they international wars or those within countries, can have many consequences. 
 
Fear of violence or persecution uproots entire communities and disrupts access to medical care for those that flee as well as those who stay behind.  
 
Conflicts normally lead to a rise in trauma injuries, but also lead to problems for people needing normal medical care, such as for complications with pregnancy or chronic diseases such as diabetes.  
 
Psychological distress and mental illnesses also generally rise, as can cases of sexual violence.  
 
We try to fill these gaps with highly experienced doctors, nurses, and logisticians, who provide specialised medical care and logistical support.